Scottish designer Christopher Kane has let a collective of Central Saint Martin (CSM) students takeover his Instagram in support of Platform, a new digital zine that aims to amplify BAME voices in fashion industry.

The students, who are studying journalism, profiled a mix of rising creatives, including stylists, photographers and hair and makeup artists.

“My entire team knew that we had to step up and take tangible actions that go beyond online sentiments,” Kane told British Vogue. “By making space on our platform to amplify their voices we hope to help lift the barriers of entry to the fashion industry,” Kane said in a statement.

The students took over the account this week, posting to his 600k followers.

Kane, in a statement on Instagram, said: “For as long as we can remember, inequality, discrimination and under-representation have been at the heart of the elitist fashion industry. Sadly, too many young, talented people have gone unnoticed because of lack of opportunities and systemic racism.

Following the recent BLM movement and protests, a multitude of people are finally waking up to the prejudice and inequalities that many are still facing on a daily basis and forcing those at the top to actually look, really look, at their structures.

Yes, this sudden interest is completely overdue. But what it lacks in many senses is authenticity. As BAME BA Fashion Journalism students at Central Saint Martins, we call for a level playing field for everyone living through these tumultuous times.

Two things: It is time that ‘cancel culture’ stopped overshadowing the voices of those actually doing some good; and that attention is placed on celebrating the BAME talents paving the way for future generations.

So, here we present you with PLATFORM, our monthly digital zine run by BAME BA Fashion Journalism and Fashion Communication students and graduates, which celebrates creative individuals and advocates striving for a sincere change.

Across our first issue you can find an honest open letter by Ore Ajala titled, ‘My Black Hair,’ expressing how integral hair is to her identity. An exclusive conversation with Natalie Roar, the Nigerian-Irish stylist representing culture and celebrating body image for artists on the main stage. And a fantastical shoot exploring Black baby dolls with ‘white face’ masks in costumes made from repurposed materials by image-maker Joe Bates.

It’s through giving a Platform to the younger generation that the story can truly move along.”

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EDITOR’S LETTER For as long as we can remember, inequality, discrimination and under-representation have been at the heart of the elitist fashion industry. Sadly, too many young, talented people have gone unnoticed because of lack of opportunities and systemic racism. Following the recent BLM movement and protests, a multitude of people are finally waking up to the prejudice and inequalities that many are still facing on a daily basis and forcing those at the top to actually look, really look, at their structures. Yes, this sudden interest is completely overdue. But what it lacks in many senses is authenticity. As BAME BA Fashion Journalism students at Central Saint Martins, we call for a level playing field for everyone living through these tumultuous times. Two things: It is time that ‘cancel culture’ stopped overshadowing the voices of those actually doing some good; and that attention is placed on celebrating the BAME talents paving the way for future generations. So, here we present you with PLATFORM, our monthly digital zine run by BAME BA Fashion Journalism and Fashion Communication students and graduates, which celebrates creative individuals and advocates striving for a sincere change. Across our first issue you can find an honest open letter by Ore Ajala titled, ‘My Black Hair,’ expressing how integral hair is to her identity. An exclusive conversation with Natalie Roar, the Nigerian-Irish stylist representing culture and celebrating body image for artists on the main stage. And a fantastical shoot exploring Black baby dolls with ‘white face’ masks in costumes made from repurposed materials by image-maker Joe Bates. It’s through giving a Platform to the younger generation that the story can truly move along. Edited by Hannah Karpel and Yelena Grelet - @Hannah.karpel @yelsss With a special thanks to all at Christopher Kane, to Tammy Kane and to our Pathway Leader and tutor, Judith Watt - @fashion.bibliophile #ChristopherKanePlatform #bafjcsm

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