Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

For many years the humble T-shirt was a brand or retailer’s go-to when doing a charity campaign, it was the perfect plain canvas to emblazon with slogans and prints to raise vital funds, in the era of the coronavirus pandemic, brands have turned to making face masks, to stop the spread as well as make charity donations.

With new Government legislation coming in to effect today, July 24, in England, making it compulsory to wear face masks in shops, supermarkets and shopping centres, as well as on public transport, following similar regulations that have been running in Scotland since July 10, FashionUnited has rounded-up the best brand and retailer’s selling face masks for good causes.

British designers launch face masks for charity

British fashion designer brands Raeburn, Mulberry, Liam Hodges, Julien Macdonald, Halpern and Rixo, have collaborated with the British Fashion Council on their ‘Great British Designer Face Coverings: Reusable, for People and Planet’ campaign to raise money for charity.

The campaign hopes to raise 1 million pounds to be split between three different charities, NHS Charities Together Covid-19 Urgent Appeal, Wings of Hope Children’s Charity, and the BFC Foundation Fashion Fund, which will support the next round of funding to give back to British designer businesses.

The reusable fabric face masks have been launched in collaboration with ethical supply chain specialists Bags of Ethics, and are sold in packs of three with two protective pouches for 15 pounds.

Caroline Rush, chief executive of the British Fashion Council, said: “Fashion is a unifying force and now, more than ever, it is essential that we collaborate and come together to support each other through difficult times. Our ambition is to contribute to the fight against Covid-19, while protecting vital PPE supplies reserved for the NHS. Through this project, we will not only celebrate British designers but also champion sustainability in a time of crisis.”

Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

Images: courtesy of the British Fashion Council

Maskey launches face mask vending machines

Maskey, the brainchild of former The Apprentice contestant Adam Freeman, has launched the UK’s first vending machines offering face masks at key locations across the UK including at shopping centres in London, Buckinghamshire, Essex and Scotland, as well as outside Hamleys’ flagship store on Regent Street and Carnaby Street in London.

The company, which launched in May, has scaled up production levels by 10 times in recent weeks and massively expanded its range of colours, designs and patterns, and is expected to install its 50th mask vending machine by the end of July.

The vending machine has a built-in card reader so that the customer just has to select the mask they want and use a contactless payment method such as their debit card or mobile phone to buy it.

The masks in the vending machine start at 6 pounds for adults and 5 pounds for children and are all made in London. 10 percent of the profit from each sale will be donated to the charity Lenderhand, which is currently supporting the NHS along with individuals and families in need during this crisis.

Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

Image: courtesy of Maskey

Celtic and Co. creates face mask to raise funds for local food bank

Luxury British brand Celtic and Co. has launched a sustainable knitted face mask that has been treated with an anti-microbial solution which they state is effective against Covid-19 and will last for up to 30 washes.

The seamless design has been made from a stretchy material that is repellent of fluid making them extremely comfortable to wear for extended periods.

All profits from the grey knitted face masks, which are being sold in packs of 2 for 26 pounds, will be donated to local Newquay Foodbank, an independent community organisation that has donated over 1500 parcels to those in need over the last year.

Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

Image: courtesy of Celtic and Co.

Hush launches face masks to support NHS Covid-19 appeal

Womenswear brand Hush has launched two face masks, featuring classic Hush prints, a leopard print and a black and white start print, in partnership with NHS Charities Together, which will provide funds for its Covid-19 appeal.

Each mask is double-layered made from 100 percent cotton, machine washable and contain a filter insert pocket. They are priced at 10 pounds each, and for each piece sold 5 pounds will go directly to the NHS Charities Together urgent Covid-19 appeal.

Mandy Watkins, founder and creative director of Hush, said: “We are incredibly proud to be partnering with NHS Charities Together on this initiative. Through the proceeds raised from our reusable face masks, we hope this will enable the charity to continue the amazing work they do supporting NHS staff, volunteers and patients that have been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic across the UK.”

Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

Images: courtesy of Hush

MaskClub launches in the UK with donations going to the NHS

MaskClub, a new company from Trevco, one of the top licensees in the world is producing double-ply face masks, hand-printed, handmade and hand-sewn in Europe featuring designs from brands like Warner Bros., Care Bears and Sesame Street.

Following the success of its launch in the US, MaskClub will donate 10 percent of sales to front line workers in each country a mask is sold, in the UK, this donation will go to the NHS Charities Together.

MaskClub doesn’t just sell individual masks, the brand has also become the first company to offer a mask subscription model, where customers will receive a new mask every month from their favourite brand. Subscriptions are 9.99 pounds a month, meaning almost 30 percent off single mask purchases at 13.99 pounds.

Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

Image: courtesy of MaskClub

Brora launches face masks in Liberty prints for charity

Brora has been working with one of its Portuguese factories to create cotton face masks using recognisable Library floral prints. The double-layer cotton masks, feature one layer of non-woven TNT fabric, an adjustable nose clip and elastic ear straps.

The fashion brand has already raised more 100,000 pounds for the NHS Charities Together and has now decided that 10 pounds from ever mask sold will be donated to other charities supporting those affected by Covid-19. The rest of the 19-pound price tag it states covers VAT, fabric, lining, sewing and transport.

Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

Image: Brora Website

Scotch and Soda raising money for The Hunger Project

Fashion brand Scotch and Soda has created a reusable black face mask, priced 9.95 pounds featuring a replaceable nano-filter that should be removed after each use and a protective bag. The mask is made from breathable, double-layered quality cotton and has a metal nose wire to secure the mask.

20 percent of gross sales from this mask go to The Hunger Project, a global, non-profit, strategic organisation committed to the sustainable end of world hunger.

Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

Image: courtesy of Scotch and Soda

Claire Mischevani launches couture-style face masks

Designer to the Royals, Claire Mischevani has launched a collection of face masks using her couture fabrics to create beautiful and unique face coverings. There are currently 30 different designs, ranging from floral designs to masks with embellishments and feathers, as well as masks designed for brides featuring crystal, lace and beading.

Prices range from 19.95 pounds for a simple forest green face mask to 199.95 pounds for a couture bridal face-covering featuring ivory crystals.

For each face mask purchase Claire Mischevani is donating 10 percent of the profits to the NET (National Emergency Trust).

Fashion brands turn to face masks for charity drives

Images: Claire Mischevani website

Ted Baker launches face masks using surplus cotton

Ted Baker has launched a collection of reusable face coverings for adults using the messaging ‘Please Stay Safe But Don’t Be Ordinary’ as part of its wider response to the coronavirus pandemic which has included the launch of Ted’s Bazaar, where 100 percent of profits from each collection go to a rotation of community-based charities.

The face masks are made from two breathable layers of 100 percent cotton and machine-washable fabric with elasticated ear straps produced using surplus cottons from previous Ted Baker collections, helping to divert stock fabric from going to landfill. A variety of reversible print combinations are available including colourful geometric patterns and signature floral designs.

The masks will be available to purchase in Ted Baker stores and online in the UK, Europe and North America and will retail for 10 pounds (12 euros/15 US dollars).

Images: courtesy of Ted Baker

 

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